Friday, 04 December Time: 11.30 - 13.00 Observer Room 08 (Venue - Le Bourget)

The event is convene by the Latin American Platform on Climate Change (PCL) and organized by FARN (Argentina), Fundación Futuro Latinoamericano (Ecuador), Ceuta (Uruguay) and Fundacion Natura (Bolivia), with the support of Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN). Simultaneous translation.

Panelists will present and discuss the processes developed by members of the PCL in five Latin American countries (Costa Rica, Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay y Uruguay) to promote multisectorial dialogues and establish communication channels with governments in order to contribute and strength national climate agendas, particularly in relation to the INDC processes.

More information about the project
http://intercambioclimatico.com/es/dialogo.html
Monday, 10 February 2014 06:15

Oficial Video COP 20 Peru

Published in youtube @en
peruAs delegates begin to reflect on the limited success of the UN Climate Change negotiations in Warsaw which ended last week, eyes are now turning optimistically to Peru as the incoming president of COP20 in 2014.
Tacloban_Typhoon_Haiyan_Trocaire/ Wikimedia CommonsIn early November, during the meeting at Chatham House in London, Todd Stern, U.S. special envoy for the climate negotiations, expressed once again the refusal of the U.S. to agree on a mechanism of loss and damage  if this was based on the compensation due to the responsibility for historical emissions of developed countries. This same negative was expressed by European countries individually and as a block on the eve of the Conference of the Parties in Warsaw.
By Timmons Roberts and Claire Langley

cop19

The winter skies were a dim grey as the second and final week began at the United Nations climate change negotiations in Warsaw, Poland.  Sadly, the hopes for an ambitious global effort to address the grave risks of a destabilized climate look similarly dim. 
Published in Climate Finance
[youtube]http://youtu.be/UCLvpxIPdMw[/youtube]
By Guy Edwards and Keith Madden Yasuni This year Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa terminated the Yasuní-ITT Initiative following the lack of international support. Ecuador proposed to keep 846 million barrels of “oil in the soil” under the Yasuní national park in exchange for compensation from the international community.
Published in Biodiversity
[caption id="attachment_6912" align="aligncenter" width="300"]AFP/Getty Images AFP/Getty Images[/caption] The U.S. has a long history of political resistance to the international climate negotiations which has meant that president Obama has had to learn from trial and error. His strategy has not always been successful and at times has been harshly criticized by both Republicans and environmentalists. However, such battles have led Obama to take an alternative route to tackle climate change through a flexible strategy that offers new possibilities to advance the international climate negotiations.
bank Since the creation of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) in 2010, concerns have grown about the World Bank's potential role in designing policies to determine the allocation of resources for adaptation and mitigation activities in developing countries.
The Bank is criticised because some of its investments have had negative social and economic impacts on populations in countries receiving financial assistance, including affecting the living conditions of indigenous peoples and, in some cases, the violation of human rights. The Bank is also criticised due to the conditionalities imposed on borrower countries. Today the World Bank is the interim trustee of the GCF, meaning it is managing the fund's financial assets for an initial three years. In this role, the Bank must manage contributions and investments, as well as provide services, including commitment accounting, cash transfers and financial reporting. But it is not responsible for allocating funds or preparing, appraising, supervising or reporting on GCF financed activities. Ostensibly, the Bank will carry out these duties until a permanent trustee is chosen through an open, transparent and competitive bidding process. Even so, the Bank has expressed interest in playing a larger role than just managing financial assets in the future. The governing instrument for the GCF states that the World Bank, in its role as interim trustee, will be subject to a review three years after the start of the Fund's operations. However, there is no rule stating that the Bank cannot continue after the review or that it could not eventually be selected as the permanent trustee. For the fourth meeting of the GCF board in late June, the GCF secretariat was asked to prepare six papers on the key issues relating to the Fund's business model framework (BMF) to facilitate board decisions on the operations of the fund. These papers were written with the support of external consultants, among them former and even current World Bank staff. Having these consultants provide guidance on the BMF will have a considerable impact on the decisions the GCF board must make. While it is still unknown how the GCF will use intermediaries when allocating resources, it is likely that financial institutions will step in to help the GCF channel money. The World Bank plans to seek accreditation to become an implementing entity of the GCF. If that is the case, the World Bank, in its role as an intermediary, must be accountable for ensuring money is used for what it was allocated. This means that the World Bank will have to take on a decision-making role to fulfill its duties. It is worth noting that during the third GCF board meeting in March there was exhaustive discussions on the administrative model that the GCF secretariat should adopt. Most board members said the most suitable model would be based on the structure of multilateral development banks (MDBs) - like the World Bank. That is because these institutions apparently attract the most qualified professionals. The board will also make a decision on the structure and organisation of the fund at their June meeting. Before this, an assessment of the structure and organisation of MDBs, including the World Bank, would help the board in considering potential and suitable options for structuring the GCF. The operational rules of the GCF are yet to be decided. Having the World Bank so close to the fund is a concern. Civil society groups fears that the GCF will end up making the same mistakes as many other financial institutions in funding unsustainable projects that generate negative social and environmental consequences. Lidy Nacpil, the regional coordinator of the Jubilee South Asia-Pacific Movement on Debt and Development said: "The World Bank has been at the forefront of financing fossil-fuel projects that have exacerbated the climate crisis. It is now an ironic contradiction that this same institution that has greatly contributed to the climate crisis is to be entrusted with funds that promise to address the very same problem it helped to create in the first place". In any event, there's still no evidence to determine the future involvement of the World Bank, only room for speculation. But it is important to remain on our toes and mindful of any moves that could increase the World Bank's involvement.   This article was published originally here.  
Published in Climate Finance
Latin American civil society organizations are backing Peru’s bid to host COP20 in 2014. The launch of the joint declaration coincides with a pending decision about who will host COP20 at the latest meeting of the UNFCCC currently underway in Bonn, Germany.
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