Monday, 10 February 2014 06:15

Oficial Video COP 20 Peru

Published in youtube @en
Friday, 23 November 2012 09:21

Latin American side events at COP18

Next week COP18 will kick off in Doha, Qatar. As the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change’s main conference of the year, COP18 will draw thousands of civil society delegates in addition to the country delegations beavering away to try and find common ground for a new climate deal. Here we provide a brief list of the official side events related to Latin America scheduled for the Doha Conference.
This report analyzes submissions made by Latin American countries to the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (AWG-ADP) and compiles the experiences of the first intercessional meeting of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) held in May, 2012, in Bonn, Germany. It is intends to provide analysis of the compiled data and the possible scenarios for the 2012 climate negotiations.
In Eastern Africa, severe drought is causing massive famines. In the United States, temperature records are soaring due to one of the warmest winters in decades. From pine beetle infestations in the Rockies to thinning ice in the Arctic, the impacts of climate change are inescapable.
Published in Adaptation
Indigenous peoples have extensive knowledge of their local environment and this knowledge can be a valuable tool for climate change adaptation. Unfortunately, indigenous knowledge is rapidly being lost as a result of globalization, out-migration, and the continued marginalization and impoverishment of indigenous peoples. Through the lens of three case studies from the Peruvian Andes, this paper by Emily Kirkland, Brown University, demonstrates the irreplaceable role that indigenous knowledge can play in adaptation to climate change, as well as the crucial contribution outside actors can play in preserving, restoring and disseminating this knowledge.
Published in Adaptation
After the longest session on record, governments at the COP17 in Durban in December 2011 agreed to negotiate by 2015 a climate deal to enter into force in 2020. The Durban Platform for Enhanced Action defied predictions that the meeting in South Africa would lead to a collapse of the UN climate talks. Many parties from Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have worked many years to make possible the political compromise achieved in the final hours and included in the Durban Platform. Today, the challenge is to make this platform ambitious enough to avoid dangerous climate change. In this new CDKN and Energeia Policy Brief we discuss the outcomes of the COP17, the contribution Latin America and the Caribbean made and the implications of the Durban Platform for the region. The Brief finishes by offering a set of recommendations:
1. Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) countries supporting high ambition at the international climate negotiations need to continue to shape a more ambitious climate narrative by acting together, domestically and internationally, and strengthening existing work with experts on bold action both within and outside the COPs. 2. Informal exchanges inside and outside of the UNFCCC process to jointly define key milestones for the Durban Platform and identify areas of convergence and divergence must take place within LAC countries and with Africa and Asia between now and 2015. 3. Both at home and abroad, the LAC region needs to improve how it communicates its successes on low carbon, climate resilient strategies to keep building confidence and generating a stronger impact at the international climate negotiations. 4. LAC countries need to continue to explore how best to advance national conversations linking climate change issues such as mitigation and resilience plans to national interests and potential losses in food security, infrastructure and trade.
To read the Policy Brief click here.
After the longest session on record, governments at the COP17 in Durban in December 2011 agreed to negotiate by 2015 a climate deal to enter into force in 2020. The Durban Platform for Enhanced Action defied predictions that the meeting in South Africa would lead to a collapse of the UN climate talks. Many parties from Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have worked many years to make possible the political compromise achieved in the final hours and included in the Durban Platform. Today, the challenge is to make this platform ambitious enough to avoid dangerous climate change. In this new CDKN and Energeia Policy Brief the authors discuss the outcomes of the COP17, the contribution Latin America and the Caribbean made and the implications of the Durban Platform for the region. The Brief finishes by offering a set of recommendations.
This presentation was made on April 6, 2012, by Brown University Research Fellow Guy Edwards and Professor Timmons Roberts at a Brown University workshop entitled ‘Beyond Competition? China, Climate Change, Security and the Developing World’. The presentation looks at how China is leading a resources boom in Latin America and whether China's legacy in the region will be one of protection or devastation.  The presentation concludes that Latin America should be able to benefit considerably from Chinese interest in the region, but only if national leaders think strategically about the imperatives of low carbon, resilient growth models.
Published in Biodiversity
Wednesday, 22 February 2012 17:54

Introduction to REDD

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Z4TIC1ObUI[/youtube]
Published in Biodiversity
By Emily Kirkland* Photo: Mylene d'Auriol Stoessel This article was originally published here. In the absence of an international climate treaty to rapidly reduce global emissions, preparing for the impacts of climate change, from melting glaciers to longer droughts, is a crucial next step. Adapting to a warmer world will require the best in modern science and engineering. It will also require us to draw on traditional sources of knowledge from rural communities and Indigenous Peoples.
Published in Adaptation