By Guy Edwards and Keith Madden Yasuni This year Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa terminated the Yasuní-ITT Initiative following the lack of international support. Ecuador proposed to keep 846 million barrels of “oil in the soil” under the Yasuní national park in exchange for compensation from the international community.
Published in Biodiversity
chile solar In a bid to protect future prosperity from serious climate change impacts, Latin American countries are attempting to balance climate action with economic growth, through domestic policy and at the UN climate talks.
This report analyses the present status of public policies on climate change and development in Latin America focusing on the agricultural, livestock and forestry sectors. As a result of a comparative analysis of 10 national reports conducted in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, El Salvador, Chile, Colombia, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay; the Regional Report identifies and analyzes specific patterns and common characteristics from agendas and climate policies of the 10 countries related to their level of implementation, the institutional strength of organizations responsible for their implementation, integration with  development policies, public participation and political support. This is the English translation of the following report published originally in Spanish.
Published in Food Security
This policy brief emerges from a process of analysis of the status and quality of the public policies on climate change and development in ten Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Uruguay, Colombia, El Salvador and Paraguay. It suggests that policies generated should have quality in the design, be implemented effectively, and guarantee institutional strengthening, greater awareness through social communication, and political and social support, for achieving its goals. It observes that combing integrated climate policies to sectoral and macroeconomic policies from each country is necessary. This will help to prioritize the climate agenda and include a comprehensive global and regional approach. It also emphasizes the importance of working collaboratively between public and private institutions with a multilevel approach. These recommendations look to promote the legitimacy, sustainability and real impact of policies.
Published in Food Security
By Guy Edwards and Susanna Mage Regardless of one's position on el Comandante Hugo Chávez, the death of the Venezuelan president opens the door for a policy debate on a critical issue for Venezuela and the world's security: climate change. As the 2015 deadline to create a new global treaty on climate change approaches, the question for the oil-rich country looms: will Venezuela be a key architect of an ambitious and equitable deal, or will it sabotage progress?
Yesterday, I spoke at an Anglo-Ecuadorian Society event at the Casa Ecuatoriana in London on Latin America and climate change. Latin America is a key battleground and laboratory for confronting climate change and decisions taken in Latin American capitals and by their negotiators at the UN climate change talks could have major implications for the UN climate regime and the region’s development options this century. Here are a few extracts from the talk.
By Guy Edwards and Susanna Mage* In an op-ed in The New York Times, Anita Isaacs suggests that Ecuador’s decision to grant WikiLeak’s founder, Julian Assange, asylum has little to do with UK-Ecuadorian relations or human rights. Ms. Isaacs argues that Ecuador’s President, Rafael Correa, is trying to bolster domestic support in the run up to a presidential election, antagonize the U.S., and position himself as a potential contender for the leadership of Latin America’s Left, given the declining health of Venezuelan President, Hugo Chávez.
Thursday, 01 September 2011 12:21

Peruvian Paramos in Peril

By Emily Kirkland* The word “paramo” comes from the Spanish word for "desolate territory”. These high-altitude wetlands act like sponges, soaking up precipitation during the rainy season and releasing it slowly over time. Rivers originating in the paramos provide water for cities and for large-scale irrigation projects. The IUCN has estimated that 100 million people in Peru, Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela ultimately depend on water from the paramos. Quito receives 85% of its water from paramos, while Bogota receives 95%.
Published in Adaptation
Credit: Bonil More information click here.
Published in Amazon
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