[youtube]http://youtu.be/Zrb2u9fIbYM[/youtube]
Tuesday, 07 May 2013 07:58

A New “Why” for Climate Action

The world needs a new “why” for climate action.  Unless the public embraces a vision for climate action that is consistent with their notions of prosperity, politicians will not challenge the status quo inside their governments and political parties.  Latin American countries need a new “why” for climate action; and nowhere is this potential for reframing political storytelling on climate action greater than in middle-income developing countries.  The public is worried about climate change. But is it asking politicians to commit to bold climate action at home? Not yet.
Monday, 22 April 2013 08:59

A Few Thoughts On Earth Day

[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/64552912[/vimeo]
This report analyses the present status of public policies on climate change and development in Latin America focusing on the agricultural, livestock and forestry sectors. As a result of a comparative analysis of 10 national reports conducted in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, El Salvador, Chile, Colombia, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay; the Regional Report identifies and analyzes specific patterns and common characteristics from agendas and climate policies of the 10 countries related to their level of implementation, the institutional strength of organizations responsible for their implementation, integration with  development policies, public participation and political support. This is the English translation of the following report published originally in Spanish.
Published in Food Security
This policy brief emerges from a process of analysis of the status and quality of the public policies on climate change and development in ten Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Uruguay, Colombia, El Salvador and Paraguay. It suggests that policies generated should have quality in the design, be implemented effectively, and guarantee institutional strengthening, greater awareness through social communication, and political and social support, for achieving its goals. It observes that combing integrated climate policies to sectoral and macroeconomic policies from each country is necessary. This will help to prioritize the climate agenda and include a comprehensive global and regional approach. It also emphasizes the importance of working collaboratively between public and private institutions with a multilevel approach. These recommendations look to promote the legitimacy, sustainability and real impact of policies.
Published in Food Security
[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/57092506[/vimeo]
Published in youtube @en
Well-worn stories of dinosaurs like the United States and India battling it out in the United Nations climate change negotiations in Doha last week continue to crowd out other, more positive stories that need to be told.  Rather than retelling the story of sticking points between the rich countries of the global North and those of the developing South, it’s crucial to see where something new is breaking through.  The greenest shoots we saw at COP18 were from a group of developing countries scarcely mentioned in the media’s fascination with conflict and acrimony between the different Parties and blocs.
In Santiago, Chile, President Barack Obama was unequivocal about the urgency of tackling climate change and embracing a more secure and sustainable energy future in the Americas.
Published in Renewable Energy
The former President of Chile and UN Special Envoy for Climate Change delivers the keynote address for Watson Institute and Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies conference titled "Latin America and Climate Change: Regional Perspectives on a Global Problem". [vimeo]http://vimeo.com/22145518[/vimeo]
Published in Adaptation
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