Friday, 04 December Time: 11.30 - 13.00 Observer Room 08 (Venue - Le Bourget)

The event is convene by the Latin American Platform on Climate Change (PCL) and organized by FARN (Argentina), Fundación Futuro Latinoamericano (Ecuador), Ceuta (Uruguay) and Fundacion Natura (Bolivia), with the support of Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN). Simultaneous translation.

Panelists will present and discuss the processes developed by members of the PCL in five Latin American countries (Costa Rica, Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay y Uruguay) to promote multisectorial dialogues and establish communication channels with governments in order to contribute and strength national climate agendas, particularly in relation to the INDC processes.

More information about the project
http://intercambioclimatico.com/es/dialogo.html
FARN_PB_FOTO Increasingly , cities are adopting policies and programs to address climate change. However, the progress and the effective implementation of these policies change  considerably between cities (or even between different public policies within the same city). There is a substantial gap between the discourse highlights the importance of local action on climate change and political reality. The purpose of this report wrote by FARN is precisely address this issue by analyzing the factors and conditions that affect the implementation of local climate policies in developing countries . This report is based on an extensive review of the literature on climate change and urban policies , as well as preliminary results of our comparative research project on climate policies in Buenos Aires , Mexico City and São Paulo , Brazil . This report is available in English. We are currently being translated into Spanish. This Policy Brief was originally published in CDKN website. For download the Policy Brief “Shaping Climate Loal Policies: A Review of Experiences", click on the box below.

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chile solar In a bid to protect future prosperity from serious climate change impacts, Latin American countries are attempting to balance climate action with economic growth, through domestic policy and at the UN climate talks.
By Guy Edwards and Susanna Mage Key Points
  1. 23 out of 79 (29%) think tanks from Latin America identified in the University Of Pennsylvania study have programs, projects or publications (PPPs) relating to climate change.
  2. Brazil has the highest total number of think tanks (7) with PPPs on climate change. Mexico (4) and Argentina (3) follow.
  3. Latin American think tanks can play a vital role in building a new narrative for climate action and ensuring its place on political agendas, party manifestos and government policy.
  4. Governments in Latin America could do a better job at ensuring the inclusion of think tanks and other organizations in the formulation, implementation and monitoring of climate policies and related debates.
  5. A report focusing on the details of these PPPs would make an important contribution to allow fellow think tanks, researchers, donors, government and NGOs to compare research findings and to locate potential partners on climate change.
  6. Organizations that conduct work on climate change but do not explicitly state the link on their websites may consider updating the descriptions of these programs and be more explicit about any PPPs relevant to climate change.
Published in Civil Society
During the last few years, Buenos Aires, São Paulo and Mexico DF, the three largest urban areas in Latin America, have taken steps in developing an institutional and policy framework to address climate change.  During the Rio + 20 summit, the mayors from these three cities signed a joint declaration in which they stressed that the local governments should take an active role in addressing climate change issues and made a series of commitments to generate a common agenda. Despite the relevance of these developments, climate change policies still face many political and institutional obstacles in these cities. This brief identifies four main challenges confronting reformist actors to advance climate change agendas at the local level, and proposes courses of actions to address these issues.
Published in Adaptation

Cromo.com-Rio-20_Admi-580x360Sustainable development has been peripheral to Brazilian elections, yet this election could mark a turning point. Street protests in 2013 sent a clear message to politicians: people want to debate Brazil’s future in the 2014 election, but so far politicians have reduced the election to a debate around personalities and power. In the run up to the October election we have a chance to show that sustainable development is not merely a debate among elites but an essential issue for Brazil’s struggle for citizen rights and equality. The task this year is to connect the dots between the environment, development and citizen rights thus making sustainable development a key electoral theme in 2014. Could the street protests and new political coalitions help promote sustainable development as a campaign issue? We argue that the political situation in Brazil may create a rare opportunity to do so for the first time since the return of democracy in the mid 1980s. Here we explain why.

Published in Sustainability @en
This report analyses the present status of public policies on climate change and development in Latin America focusing on the agricultural, livestock and forestry sectors. As a result of a comparative analysis of 10 national reports conducted in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, El Salvador, Chile, Colombia, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay; the Regional Report identifies and analyzes specific patterns and common characteristics from agendas and climate policies of the 10 countries related to their level of implementation, the institutional strength of organizations responsible for their implementation, integration with  development policies, public participation and political support. This is the English translation of the following report published originally in Spanish.
Published in Food Security
This policy brief emerges from a process of analysis of the status and quality of the public policies on climate change and development in ten Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Uruguay, Colombia, El Salvador and Paraguay. It suggests that policies generated should have quality in the design, be implemented effectively, and guarantee institutional strengthening, greater awareness through social communication, and political and social support, for achieving its goals. It observes that combing integrated climate policies to sectoral and macroeconomic policies from each country is necessary. This will help to prioritize the climate agenda and include a comprehensive global and regional approach. It also emphasizes the importance of working collaboratively between public and private institutions with a multilevel approach. These recommendations look to promote the legitimacy, sustainability and real impact of policies.
Published in Food Security
During George W. Bush’s administration, the government was under pressure to act on climate change, but saw the U.N. as a dead end for negotiations.  Instead of the cumbersome talks with almost 200 countries at the table, the Bush administration favored “minilateral” or “plurilateral” solutions with small groups of countries.
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