In spite of the increasing importance of climate and environmental factors when triggering human displacements, it is necessary to emphasize their interaction with other social, economic and political factors so we can better understand migratory movements today.
Published in Adaptation
This report analyses the present status of public policies on climate change and development in Latin America focusing on the agricultural, livestock and forestry sectors. As a result of a comparative analysis of 10 national reports conducted in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, El Salvador, Chile, Colombia, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay; the Regional Report identifies and analyzes specific patterns and common characteristics from agendas and climate policies of the 10 countries related to their level of implementation, the institutional strength of organizations responsible for their implementation, integration with  development policies, public participation and political support. This is the English translation of the following report published originally in Spanish.
Published in Food Security
This policy brief emerges from a process of analysis of the status and quality of the public policies on climate change and development in ten Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Uruguay, Colombia, El Salvador and Paraguay. It suggests that policies generated should have quality in the design, be implemented effectively, and guarantee institutional strengthening, greater awareness through social communication, and political and social support, for achieving its goals. It observes that combing integrated climate policies to sectoral and macroeconomic policies from each country is necessary. This will help to prioritize the climate agenda and include a comprehensive global and regional approach. It also emphasizes the importance of working collaboratively between public and private institutions with a multilevel approach. These recommendations look to promote the legitimacy, sustainability and real impact of policies.
Published in Food Security

The impacts of climate change in Latin America are increasingly alarming and greatly affect the agricultural, livestock and forestry sectors. This leads to a situation of economic, social, environmental and political vulnerability in the region; while putting at risk human and food security and the basic conditions necessary to reduce poverty.
By Guy Edwards and Susanna Mage Regardless of one's position on el Comandante Hugo Chávez, the death of the Venezuelan president opens the door for a policy debate on a critical issue for Venezuela and the world's security: climate change. As the 2015 deadline to create a new global treaty on climate change approaches, the question for the oil-rich country looms: will Venezuela be a key architect of an ambitious and equitable deal, or will it sabotage progress?
[youtube]http://youtu.be/HH2nwn3dYj4[/youtube]
Published in Adaptation
The Latin American Platform on Climate (known by its Spanish acronym PCL) has published a report on the state and quality of public policies on climate change and development in Latin America, particularly those focused on agriculture and forestry.  This report is the product of an initiative by the PCL based on 10 national reports for countries in the region (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay).  All the reports, both national and regional, are available here in Spanish. An English version of the regional report only can be downloaded here.
Published in Adaptation
More than 40 high level officials and experts from various Latin American countries met in Lima this month to debate the importance of public policies on climate change in the region, with a particular focus on the agricultural and forestry sectors, using as its basis a report prepared by the Latin American Platform on Climate.
Payments for environmental services (PES) is a theoretical marvel. Experiences from around the world, however, suggest that PES can be an inappropriate strategy in many countries, and can lead practitioners into a series of intellectual and financial dead-ends.
Published in Amazon
Coordination is weak between public policies on climate change and development planning in Latin America, said Manuel Rodríguez-Becerra, ex Minister of Environment of Colombia, during the Latin American Platform on Climate (LAPC) side event at the Río+20 Conference.
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