By Guy Edwards and Susanna Mage Key Points
  1. 23 out of 79 (29%) think tanks from Latin America identified in the University Of Pennsylvania study have programs, projects or publications (PPPs) relating to climate change.
  2. Brazil has the highest total number of think tanks (7) with PPPs on climate change. Mexico (4) and Argentina (3) follow.
  3. Latin American think tanks can play a vital role in building a new narrative for climate action and ensuring its place on political agendas, party manifestos and government policy.
  4. Governments in Latin America could do a better job at ensuring the inclusion of think tanks and other organizations in the formulation, implementation and monitoring of climate policies and related debates.
  5. A report focusing on the details of these PPPs would make an important contribution to allow fellow think tanks, researchers, donors, government and NGOs to compare research findings and to locate potential partners on climate change.
  6. Organizations that conduct work on climate change but do not explicitly state the link on their websites may consider updating the descriptions of these programs and be more explicit about any PPPs relevant to climate change.
Published in Civil Society
During the last few years, Buenos Aires, São Paulo and Mexico DF, the three largest urban areas in Latin America, have taken steps in developing an institutional and policy framework to address climate change.  During the Rio + 20 summit, the mayors from these three cities signed a joint declaration in which they stressed that the local governments should take an active role in addressing climate change issues and made a series of commitments to generate a common agenda. Despite the relevance of these developments, climate change policies still face many political and institutional obstacles in these cities. This brief identifies four main challenges confronting reformist actors to advance climate change agendas at the local level, and proposes courses of actions to address these issues.
Published in Adaptation
This report analyses the present status of public policies on climate change and development in Latin America focusing on the agricultural, livestock and forestry sectors. As a result of a comparative analysis of 10 national reports conducted in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, El Salvador, Chile, Colombia, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay; the Regional Report identifies and analyzes specific patterns and common characteristics from agendas and climate policies of the 10 countries related to their level of implementation, the institutional strength of organizations responsible for their implementation, integration with  development policies, public participation and political support. This is the English translation of the following report published originally in Spanish.
Published in Food Security
This policy brief emerges from a process of analysis of the status and quality of the public policies on climate change and development in ten Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Uruguay, Colombia, El Salvador and Paraguay. It suggests that policies generated should have quality in the design, be implemented effectively, and guarantee institutional strengthening, greater awareness through social communication, and political and social support, for achieving its goals. It observes that combing integrated climate policies to sectoral and macroeconomic policies from each country is necessary. This will help to prioritize the climate agenda and include a comprehensive global and regional approach. It also emphasizes the importance of working collaboratively between public and private institutions with a multilevel approach. These recommendations look to promote the legitimacy, sustainability and real impact of policies.
Published in Food Security
[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/57092506[/vimeo]
Published in youtube @en
By Victoria Elmore* and Guy Edwards Over the course of 2013 & 2014 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will publish its Fifth Assessment Report (AR5).  In 2007 the IPCC shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore. Although there has been some recent controversy surrounding the IPCC, it remains the most authoritative and trusted international scientific body on climate change. The following list, which is based on information available on the IPCC’s site, profiles all the Latin American and Caribbean scientists involved in the AR5. It is divided up into the three Working Groups and includes the name, country and institution of each scientist from the region. This list raises a number of interesting questions on the current state of investigation on climate change in the region, which we will try and address in another post soon.
Sunday, 26 December 2010 11:11

An Incredible Gift

By Kelly Rogers* Global natural gas supply provides incredible potential for a transportation revolution in Latin America, a message highlighted at an event in Cancun, co-hosted by the Worldwatch Institute and the International Gas Union. According to BP, Latin America provides some 5.5% of the world’s natural gas and is estimated to hold at least 6% of its natural gas reserves.