Monday, 01 December 2014 12:30

Latin America’s Climate Vanguard

SANTIAGO – Latin America may have weathered the global economic slowdown, but for many, the potential impact of global warming, and the measures required to avoid its worst effects, may undermine the region’s fragile political, economic, and social balance – and roll back years of progress.

By Alison Kirsch and Guy Edwards  chilecc Chile is at a crossroads. Copper prices are falling, the gap between energy supply and demand is widening. Chile faces a difficult balancing act to maintain its strong economic growth and the energy this requires, while ensuring progress on its climate, environmental and clean energy goals. In this whirlwind of domestic change, Chile has the opportunity to reaffirm its position as a global leader on climate change.
Published in Energy
peruAs delegates begin to reflect on the limited success of the UN Climate Change negotiations in Warsaw which ended last week, eyes are now turning optimistically to Peru as the incoming president of COP20 in 2014.
[youtube]http://youtu.be/UCLvpxIPdMw[/youtube]
Cop18 Doha : opening session of the United Nations Climate Change A new coalition between the EU and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) could be just the ticket to rejuvenate the UN climate change negotiations as they enter their third decade next week in Warsaw. This bi-regional partnership can serve as a vehicle to build momentum towards a fair, robust and ambitious agreement. All EU and LAC countries have expressed their will to adopt a new agreement by 2015, and surveys have repeatedly shown that their citizens are very concerned about climate impacts.
A recent visit to Costa Rica by Chinese President Xi Jinping has led to a mounting backlash against a proposed oil refinery, which undermines Costa Rica’s target of becoming carbon neutral by 2021.
Published in Energy
Tuesday, 07 May 2013 07:58

A New “Why” for Climate Action

The world needs a new “why” for climate action.  Unless the public embraces a vision for climate action that is consistent with their notions of prosperity, politicians will not challenge the status quo inside their governments and political parties.  Latin American countries need a new “why” for climate action; and nowhere is this potential for reframing political storytelling on climate action greater than in middle-income developing countries.  The public is worried about climate change. But is it asking politicians to commit to bold climate action at home? Not yet.
Wednesday, 13 February 2013 10:46

Peru and Venezuela compete to host COP20 in 2014

Next year a Latin American and the Caribbean country will host the annual UN climate change negotiations or ‘COP20’ of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Rumours are circulating that Peru and Venezuela are interested in hosting COP20. As the 2015 deadline to create a new global climate change treaty looms closer, Peru appears to be the stronger candidate.
Yesterday, I spoke at an Anglo-Ecuadorian Society event at the Casa Ecuatoriana in London on Latin America and climate change. Latin America is a key battleground and laboratory for confronting climate change and decisions taken in Latin American capitals and by their negotiators at the UN climate change talks could have major implications for the UN climate regime and the region’s development options this century. Here are a few extracts from the talk.
Well-worn stories of dinosaurs like the United States and India battling it out in the United Nations climate change negotiations in Doha last week continue to crowd out other, more positive stories that need to be told.  Rather than retelling the story of sticking points between the rich countries of the global North and those of the developing South, it’s crucial to see where something new is breaking through.  The greenest shoots we saw at COP18 were from a group of developing countries scarcely mentioned in the media’s fascination with conflict and acrimony between the different Parties and blocs.