Well-worn stories of dinosaurs like the United States and India battling it out in the United Nations climate change negotiations in Doha last week continue to crowd out other, more positive stories that need to be told.  Rather than retelling the story of sticking points between the rich countries of the global North and those of the developing South, it’s crucial to see where something new is breaking through.  The greenest shoots we saw at COP18 were from a group of developing countries scarcely mentioned in the media’s fascination with conflict and acrimony between the different Parties and blocs.
For 15 years, climate policy wonks have been talking about “the post-2012 World,” describing the years after the end of the Kyoto Protocol’s “first commitment period,” which ran from 2005 to 2012.  Now just three weeks away, the post-2012 world is actually much fuzzier than ever before.  Just as we near the shore, a fog is descending.
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Friday, 23 November 2012 09:21

Latin American side events at COP18

Written by
Next week COP18 will kick off in Doha, Qatar. As the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change’s main conference of the year, COP18 will draw thousands of civil society delegates in addition to the country delegations beavering away to try and find common ground for a new climate deal. Here we provide a brief list of the official side events related to Latin America scheduled for the Doha Conference.
The Latin American Platform on Climate (known by its Spanish acronym PCL) has published a report on the state and quality of public policies on climate change and development in Latin America, particularly those focused on agriculture and forestry.  This report is the product of an initiative by the PCL based on 10 national reports for countries in the region (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay).  All the reports, both national and regional, are available here in Spanish. An English version of the regional report only can be downloaded here.
By Suzy Mage and Guy Edwards

Chile's LAN airline recently took over Brazil’s TAM, creating LATAM – the world's second largest airline by market value. This merger reflects the impressive growth in Latin America’s aviation sector which is expected to see air passenger numbers almost triple by 2030. Given the rapid rise of aviation’s contribution to global carbon emissions, the connection between air travel and climate change in Latin America and other developing regions cannot be ignored.

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This letter was originally published on the Guardian's website by Pa Ousman Jarju who chairs the Least Developed Countries group at the UN climate change negotiations.